TABLE OF CONTENTS

Richard Hamilton

There were three great European artists I was proud to number among my friends. Marcel Broodthaers was the first to go, and he, sadly, did not live long enough to enjoy the recognition he began to receive toward the end of his life. Joseph Beuys was awarded his laurels at a Guggenheim show in 1979 and shot to number one in Willy Baumgart’s world listing of artists in Capital, the German financial newspaper. He carried his celebrity with splendor until he died. Dieter Roth resisted fame all his life; in spite of his self-proclaimed jealousy of other artists’ success, he did little to encourage his supporters.

A photographer once asked him if he might be permitted to make a portrait. Dieter refused, saying, “It took me forty-six years to grow this face; why should I give it to you?” He always distrusted dealers because they wished to profit from his art; even devoted collectors were viewed

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