TABLE OF CONTENTS

architecture

Edward Durell Stone and Paul Rudolph

AS WE APPROACH THE MILLENNIUM, in architecture as in fashion, our appetite for salvaging designs from recent decades grows ever more voracious. But would some artifacts do well to simply remain in the closet? Many fail to see how critically maligned buildings might get better with age, and on the short list of most endangered mid-’60s structures are Edward Durell Stone’s Huntington Hartford Building and Paul Rudolph’s Beekman Place triplex.

The city’s recent selection of David Child’s proposal for replacing the Coliseum on Columbus Circle has cast a spotlight on its vulnerable neighbor, Two Columbus Circle. Known in a previous life as the Gallery of Modern Art, this poured-concrete marble-clad structure was commissioned in 1965 by Huntington Hartford to rival the Museum of Modern Art. The current owner, the City of New York, is considering selling the off-white elephant to Donald Trump,

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