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film

Blind Spot: Hitler’s Secretary

AS I SLID INTO MY SEAT at Alice Tully Hall for the New York Film Festival screening of Blind Spot: Hitler’s Secretary, I noticed the auditorium was only one-third occupied. A man behind me remarked, “I guess this isn’t a big seller.” I wondered why anyone would expect that a documentary about an unknown Nazi factotum like Traudl Junge would sell out. Who wants to know about the intricacies and intimacies of Adolf Hitler’s daily schedule? Who cares what this heinous criminal ate for dinner, how he related to his girlfriend, or to his dog? More to the point, who could bear to witness this naive, amoral functionary who served Hitler as stenographer, typist, file clerk?

By the time the presenters of the film shuffled onto the stage, the theater was packed. Any doubts as to the public’s curiosity about the confessions of Hitler’s secretary were dispelled. Perhaps some of the attraction to this

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