TABLE OF CONTENTS

Martin Herbert

MARTIN HERBERT

1 Oliver Payne and Nick Relph, Gentlemen (Tate Britain, London) “You ain’t even impressed no more, you’re used to it,” raps Marshall Mathers. It’s getting that way with Payne and Relph, who predictably stomped their moribund neighbors in this year’s Tate Triennial Exhibition of Contemporary British Art. So, reality check. They may have bitten much style from Mark Leckey, Harmony Korine, and Charles Baudelaire, but Gentlemen, 2003—drifting footage of decrepit London toilets, sportive pigeons, and shimmering glitter, frosted with Morse-code bleeps and a voice-over that’s the bitterest, campiest bitch slap of default shallowness you’re likely to hear any time soon—was another instance of Payne and Relph saying, in effect, “It’s not like that, it’s like this,” and being absolutely correct.

2 Jane and Louise Wilson, A Free and Anonymous Monument (BALTIC, Gateshead, England)

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