TABLE OF CONTENTS

Thelma Golden

THELMA GOLDEN

1 The Blackout Because it was not tinged—predictions notwithstanding—with death, disaster, or even looting, the blackout of August 2003 offered New Yorkers the most profoundly moving experience of the year. Anxiety, exertion, exhaustion, heat, silence, suspense, and relief all converged to create a day, night, and day of sheer visceral response. In retrospect, it felt like what we often want (and are left wanting) from art and life. Forget all the feel-good news stories of nice neighbors and the “spirit” of the city. The blackout worked us. Like nothing in the art world has in a long, long time.

2 David Hammons (Ace Gallery, New York) When the announcement arrived, it was clear this show could be everything or nothing. Everything being the mega-retrospective we’ve been praying for over the decade-plus since “Rousing the Rubble.” Or nothing as in nothing. Nada. Hammons,

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