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1000 WORDS: ANTHONY McCALL

More than thirty years after British-born artist Anthony McCall created his now-legendary Line Describing a Cone, the first of his “solid light” films, the elegantly simple 1973 work—a projected white dot that slowly grows over thirty minutes into a circular line on the facing wall, eventually filling the dark space with a conical “volume” whose vivid corporality is a beguiling trick of light and atmosphere—remains one of postwar art’s signal explorations of perceptual boundary states. Light and dark, stasis and movement, substance and immateriality, cinema and sculpture: As with all McCall’s early projections, Line Describing a Cone tests the thresholds between these essential conditions. Like the post-Minimalist program within which they are conceptually situated, the “solid light” works—at once emphatically filmic and ineffably sculptural—recalibrate the relationships between audience,

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