TABLE OF CONTENTS

LANGUAGE IN THE VICINITY OF ART: ARTISTS’ WRITINGS, 1960–1975

“I DON’T LIKE THE INCORPORATION OF THE NAMABLE IN SCULPTURE.” Carl Andre’s observation from a 1968 interview reflects on the absence of image or allusion in advanced art of the period, but it remains pithily ironic: It is one hallmark of American art between roughly 1960 and 1975 that objects and installations were attended by massive quantities of artists’ words, texts that fall across the artmaking landscape and settle like a heavy discursive drift. For one thing, artists were critics: Donald Judd reviewed dozens of exhibitions in New York galleries from 1959 to 1965 and composed several essays, such as “Specific Objects,” in which he attempted to describe and account for the changing ontology of painting and sculpture; during the late ’60s and early ’70s, Mel Bochner covered exhibitions of new art in the critical press; both Bochner and Robert Morris composed defining theoretical

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