TABLE OF CONTENTS

NO MORE SCALE: THE EXPERIENCE OF SIZE IN CONTEMPORARY SCULPTURE

The appropriation of the gigantic on the part of commodity relations marks the magicalization of the commodity, the final masking of the gigantic apparatus which is the nature of class relations themselves. —Susan Stewart, On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection (1984)

The size is nothing; what matters is the scale. —Barnett Newman, in Pierre Schneider, “Through the Louvre with Barnett Newman” (1969)

Olafur Eliasson’s The Weather Project, 2003, is a work that commands attention. The most recent in a series of commissions funded by Unilever for Tate Modern, the work suffuses the museum’s Turbine Hall with an apocalyptic glow, the effect of hundreds of yellow mono-frequency lamps arranged behind a giant translucent half disk suspended on the back wall. Above, a mirrored ceiling spans the vast room’s length, suggesting the illusion that

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