TABLE OF CONTENTS

ALL TOGETHER NOW: CROWD SCENES IN CONTEMPORARY ART

German art historian Wolfgang Kemp has observed that the crowd appears in art when it erupts in political life. Jacques-Louis David’s Tennis Court Oath, 1791, depicting the start of the French Revolution, began what would be a line of images of politicized crowds by artists including Daumier and Delacroix.1 The nineteenth century also saw the leisure crowd, at the opera or swarming the streets of Paris on a holiday. After modernism’s long (but not, of course, complete) vacation from such subjects, analogues of this classic imagery have been appearing during the past decade in the work of artists as diverse as Andreas Gursky, Glenn Ligon, Vanessa Beecroft, Matthew Barney, Andrea Bowers, and Paul Pfeiffer. 2

The theme of the crowd came into sharper focus after September 11, 2001. For people in New York, the event was a powerful reminder that we live in a densely packed metropolis. It precipitated

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