TABLE OF CONTENTS

SOUND THINKING: BRUCE NAUMAN AT THE TURBINE HALL

BRUCE NAUMAN HAS ALWAYS BEEN an artist who does the opposite of what you think he should, then somehow makes you think it was exactly the right thing to do. When he agreed to create a work for Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, I thought he had clearly accepted an invitation to fail. The Turbine Hall is the Jaws of museum architecture. With few exceptions, it opens its massive mouth and swallows what it is fed, even when artists super-size their work to the point that it seems like a caricature of itself. At 500 feet long, 115 feet high, and 75 feet wide, this public mall seems particularly wrong for Nauman, whose work is intensely psychological and private. For me, all of his sculptures, including the room-size installations, operate on a human scale. To make matters worse, Nauman’s project follows what was arguably the Hall’s most popular installation—Olafur Eliasson’s dramatic (some would

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW at the special holiday rate of $45 a year—70% off the newsstand price. You’ll receive the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.