TABLE OF CONTENTS

PRINT October 2006

SUFFICIENT GROUNDS: THE ART OF BLAKE RAYNE

IN 1966 JOAN DIDION wrote an essay for the New York Times Magazine profiling Joan Baez, who at twenty-five years old was nearly as famous for her activism as for her folksinging (which is to say very). Baez had opened her own school—the Institute for the Study of Nonviolence—in California’s Carmel Valley, and Didion’s piece detailed the legal proceedings initiated by some of that area’s less “liberal” occupants after finding the organization in their immediate vicinity. But, however focused around this local issue, the essay ultimately crafts a subtle portrait of a figure produced by and for a public. Baez, as depicted by Didion, is shown to have filled a role—for fans and detractors alike—in the cultural theater of politics. “Joan Baez was a personality before she was entirely a person,” Didion writes, “and, like anyone to whom that happens, she is in a sense the hapless victim of what

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