TABLE OF CONTENTS

MODERNIST PERSUASION: LE CORBUSIER’S TOWARD AN ARCHITECTURE

IN JUST A FEW YEARS, the first works of modern architecture will be one hundred years old. The modern will officially become antique. Hardly a surprise: The new has long been old. Indeed, for more than fifty years there have been attempts to preserve key works of modern architecture against the effects of time. Permanent physical and legal defenses have been erected against decay, renovation, addition, and demolition. More and more of the surviving buildings are being meticulously restored to their original condition and cleaned for viewing by ever-increasing waves of architectural tourists. The modernist icons have become museums containing themselves, proud exhibitionists flaunting their historical value, strangely pristine jewels extracted from the relentless entropy of their original use as houses, schools, or offices, to be treated as precious art objects exchanged in an endlessly

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.