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MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA: THE ART OF PHIL COLLINS

PHIL COLLINS AND KARAOKE were both born in the 1970s, the decade during which, according to the novelist Michael Cunningham, dreams of revolution faded and people began to dance. And dancing is at the center of the project that is probably Collins’s best known to date, the seven-hour double-screen video projection of a dance marathon, called they shoot horses, 2004. This work lays out all the basic parameters of Collins’s practice: The British, Glasgow-based artist goes somewhere (in this case, Ramallah) that is not his home and that is politically volatile and vaguely suggestive of the biennial circuit in its “global” character. Once there, he issues an open call for some kind of activity or event, conducts auditions, and, after securing the agreement of the participants, starts rolling the camera. While the activities may differ, the formal dependence on real-time duration, a relatively

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