TABLE OF CONTENTS

books

Lynn Spigel’s TV by Design

THE AUDIENCE FOR ART is never static, but it is limited. I have always thought that if your ambition is actually to “change minds” on a large scale, at least in the United States, you need to move to Hollywood. If you want to “talk” to the public, you can’t wait for tourists to pay twenty dollars on an annual vacation to New York to walk by your art in a museum. You have to bring it into their living rooms by working in television, or film, or (gulp) advertising. I know this sounds snarky and defensive. Television? Please. In the words of John Waters, I wouldn’t suck your lousy dick if I was suffocating and there was oxygen in your balls. We wouldn’t even consider working in television. Our egos could never survive the system.

But art and television weren’t always so opposed. They weren’t always mocking each other at cocktail parties to mask their mutual envy. In TV by Design, Lynn Spigel,

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the February 2009 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.