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Haegue Yang

Haegue Yang’s slatted shades are central to a distinctive sculptural vocabulary the artist has been tweaking for nearly two years.

Curated by Doryun Chong

In case you were wondering, Haegue Yang’s venetian-blind installations at the Venice Biennale—in the Arsenale and again in the Korean pavilion—were not intended as a reference to the city. No, those slatted shades (in addition to lamps, heaters, audio equipment, and scent blasters) are central to a distinctive sculptural vocabulary the artist has been tweaking for nearly two years. That body of work, which arises from Yang’s poetic engagement with politically charged biographies, saw its high point in Yearning Melancholy Red (coproduced by the Walker and REDCAT in Los Angeles, where it debuted in 2008). The installation forms the centerpiece to this survey of roughly a dozen works, the artist’s first museum solo show in the US (following an extensive round on the biennial and kunsthalle circuit).

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