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NOWHERE MAN: HADEN GUEST TALKS WITH MONTE HELLMAN

THROUGHOUT A LONG AND EXTRAORDINARY CAREER, Monte Hellman has remained simultaneously at the cutting edge and at the very farthest margins of post-studio-era American cinema. In influential major films such as The Shooting (1965) and Two-Lane Blacktop (1971), Hellman defined a distinct brand of art cinema by reinventing traditional genre formulas—here, those of the western and the road movie—to create boldly minimal and mesmerizing portraits of characters inexorably driven by obscure desires. Hellman’s debut film and improbable entry as an auteur director was, in fact, a horror picture—Beast from Haunted Cave (1959), an almost impossibly threadbare creature feature produced by Roger Corman and transformed by Hellman into a gripping, visually striking crime drama that announced his unusual talents as a bold stylist and intuitively resourceful artist. The early stage of Hellman’s career was,

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