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STRUCTURAL TENSION: THE ART OF OSCAR TUAZON

IT’S EASY ENOUGH to see the work of Oscar Tuazon as a vehement attack on architecture. The Paris-based artist’s two most recent shows, for example—an untitled project at the Kunsthalle Bern and My Mistake at London’s Institute of Contemporary Arts this past spring and summer, respectively—each staged a dramatic encounter between installation and white cube. Both were large-scale frame constructions, assembled from eight-by-eight- or twelve-by twelve-inch beams of unfinished wood, roughly cut to size with a chain saw and bolted together. In both shows, the frames filled an entire floor, weaving in and out of multiple rooms. Not only is their raw materiality a striking contrast to the high finish of the galleries, but the structures appear to flout the buildings’ existing spatial organization with a defiantly independent logic. Where Tuazon’s beams encounter the gallery walls, they simply

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