TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHARACTER STUDY: THE ART OF MICHAELA MEISE

THE HUMAN BODY—that ghost of monumentality and figuration inexorably haunting modernism—is ever present in Michaela Meise’s work. Whether, in her numerous films, she takes on the pose of a neoclassical sculpture (as in Étude Carpeaux, 2008) or presents herself as a ballerina trapped in a gated community in South Africa (as in Ballerina Diary, 2001), she always makes sure her body is what everything else must relate to. And although Meise’s sculptural objects at first glance appear dry and reserved, on closer inspection they no less distinctly refer to the figural. Usually made of plywood panels and roughly human size, these sculptures spell out what Michael Fried famously termed Minimal art’s “latent . . . anthropomorphism.” Trans Columns, 2009, Meise’s fragile bundles of unsteady poles of painted wood, for example—on view last year in the solo show “Constitution” at Greene Naftali Gallery

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