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Lee Ufan

Lee Ufan hunting for stones, East Hampton, NY, October 2010. Photo: David Heald. © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

“LEE UFAN: MARKING INFINITY”

SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK

June 24–September 28

Curated by Alexandra Munroe

LEE UFAN WAS A CHAMPION of the global long before the global turn actually came to pass. As the theoretical pillar of the Mono-ha, or Things School, the loose constellation of artists whose use of ordinary materials such as cotton, wood, rope, and even dirt significantly affected the Japanese art world in the late 1960s, and a pivotal figure in the tansaekhwa (monochromatic painting) movement—arguably the most important artistic development in twentieth-century Korea, which offered a fundamentally different approach to modernist abstraction—Lee emphasized materiality as the means by which to produce “encounters” that would connect objects and viewers, which in turn would show the “world as it is.” He did so by drawing on multiple conceptions of the physical

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