TABLE OF CONTENTS

CLOSE-UP: MOVEMENT RESEARCH

Sharon Lockhart, Five Dances and Nine Wall Carpets by Noa Eshkol, 2011, color film in 35 mm transferred to HD video, five-channel installation, continuous loop. Noga Goral, Mor Bashan, Ruti Sela, Or Gal-Or.

FOR NEARLY TWO DECADES, Sharon Lockhart’s films (and, more recently, HD videos) have maintained a consistent approach to their varied subjects, whether laborers or children playing—so consistent, in fact, as to constitute a kind of signature. Employing a fixed frame and tending toward long takes in a highly structured (if not precisely structuralist) sequence of shots, Lockhart’s lens could be described as empirical in its apparently cool remove. In Goshogaoka, 1998, the camera, in a series of long takes, records a squad of adolescent Japanese girls practicing basketball drills in a gymnasium, sneakers squeaking along the wooden floor with military precision. The more recent Double Tide, 2009, is composed of two fifty-minute shots of a solitary clam digger extracting bivalves from the coastal muck, the first filmed at dawn, the second at dusk. The clam digger traverses space

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