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THE MORE THINGS CHANGE: THE ART OF ROMAN ONDÁK

Roman Ondák, Observations (details), 1995/2011, 120 clippings, grouped in seventy-two frames, each clipping measuring between 1 7/8 x 2“ and 3 x 4”.

THE ENDURING EPHEMERAL: I borrow this term from Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, who introduced it in her 2011 book Programmed Visions in order to articulate the following paradox of digital memory culture. As our worldly goods become increasingly immaterial, we rely more and more on hardware and software that promise to safeguard our possessions, to imbue our documents, communications, images, books, music, and financial information with a measure of permanence. We rely, in short, on digital storage, but in so doing, we curiously conflate the concept of storage with the concept of memory itself. Whereas memory may once have been understood as an active faculty, a process of recollecting that serves the purposes of the present, it is now conceived as a realm of stasis, where information is securely and indefinitely stowed for future use. Yet storage is exactly what is not provided by the

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