TABLE OF CONTENTS

GUTAI AND AFTER

IN 1956, the artist Jirō Yoshihara created a work that made use of a dinghy floating on the water in a disused oil tank, for the “Ruins Exhibition” at an old refinery in Amagasaki, Japan. So there was a direct precedent when I, along with other members of the Gutai group, was asked to participate in the 1966 event “Zero on Sea,” a group exhibition to be held on both land and water at Scheveningen Pier, The Hague, with artists contributing environmental works conceived for the site. If “Zero on Sea” had been realized, it would surely have extended across the land, sea, and air as a fusion of Gutai’s previous outdoor, aerial, and marine exhibitions.

I was personally attracted to the plan because the exhibition was going to be held, literally, at sea. When I joined Gutai, I thought I’d have a chance to take part in the nonmuseum-style activities for which the group had come to be known. But

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