TABLE OF CONTENTS

BETWEEN TWO WORLDS: THE ART OF LUIGI GHIRRI

Luigi Ghirri, Ile Rousse, 1976, C-print, 9 1/2 x 14 1/8". From the series “Kodachrome,” 1970–78.

IMAGINE ENTERING A DARK ROOM in which the landscape outside appears slowly and upside down. Everything you know becomes strange and intimate, and it takes time to realize that you are immersed in a projection that endows a new sense of being in the world. Flipping the ordinary into the extraordinary, Luigi Ghirri’s astonishing small color photographs share a similar effect, if not an actual orientation. Twenty-one years after the artist’s premature passing at the age of forty-nine, we are still captivated by his enigmatic vision of routine life.

Living in an Italy overrun by clichéd images of its own heritage, Ghirri sought a new mode of representing the country’s landscape through what he called “minimal journeys” within a few miles of his home, focusing on the marginal and minor as sites for discovery of the self. “The subjects of my photographs are those of the everyday,” he

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