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CITY OF DUST: ARCHITECTURE AND SUBNATURE IN LOS ANGELES

Eric Owen Moss Architects, Beehive, 2001, Culver City, CA. Photo: Tom Bonner.

Ecological crises are everywhere, and it is precisely this pervasiveness, this immersion, that a growing number of artists and architects today aim to address—delving into the complex interchange between our built environment and the natural world. A range of exhibitions on view this summer, such as MoMA PS1’s “Expo 1: New York,” probe the potential of participatory art practices to address environmental concerns; while this year’s “Pacific Standard Time” initiative, organized by the Getty Research Institute, focuses on architecture in postwar Los Angeles—a city famously dogged by the severe pollution that resulted from its specific historical and geographic circumstances. Artforum invited architectural historian DAVID GISSEN to reflect on the relationship between LA’s architecture and its environment, revealing the latter’s profound, if often little

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