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Women and Work

Margaret Harrison, Kay Hunt, and Mary Kelly, Women and Work: A Document on the Division of Labour in Industry 1973–1975, mixed media, dimensions variable. Installation view, Tate Britain, London, 2014.

NOW CELEBRATED as a milestone of Conceptual art, Margaret Harrison, Kay Hunt, and Mary Kelly’s Women and Work: A Document on the Division of Labour in Industry 1973–1975 entered the historical record unassumingly. The minutes of the March 19, 1973, meeting of the Women’s Workshop, a feminist group within London’s Artists’ Union, note that Harrison, Hunt, and Kelly formed a minicollective in order to examine conditions faced by women workers at a local factory. The decidedly activist bent of this quasi-sociological study was clear: According to the minutes, the trio aimed for the project to “seek links with relevant trade unions and anti-discrimination campaigns.” Their research endeavor took shape as an ambitious installation of black-and-white photographs, audiotapes, charts, film, and text panels and was first displayed in 1975 at the South London Art Gallery, not far from

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