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Ben Vickers

Rendering of 3-D-printable “Liberator” single-shot firearm. Photo: Defense Distributed/Wikicommons.

IF 2013 WAS THE YEAR the Internet lost its innocence, 2014 may be remembered as the year the backlash began. Now, it seems, the hacker body politic has found new resolve in its opposition to the nation-state, deeming it a wholly unacceptable organizational and social form for the aspirations of the twenty-first century—not least because of its colonization of the Internet and insinuation into our everyday lives.

The year commenced in the wake of Edward Snowden’s heartbreaking revelations about the National Security Agency’s massive surveillance program. The gravest of state-orchestrated violations could no longer remain consigned to the official narrative—the facts were laid bare for the world to see in the weeks following Snowden’s security breaches. And the news was perhaps nowhere more powerfully dissected than at the Chaos Communication Congress, one of the world’s

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