TABLE OF CONTENTS

Pauline J. Yao

Li Yuan-Chia, Untitled (detail), ca. 1980, metal, magnets, gelatin silver prints, dimensions variable.

1 HONG KONG PROTESTS As is the case with any question of cultural identity, what it means to be Hong Kong Chinese today is constantly evolving. On September 28, as young people took to the streets demanding true democracy, a crucial new phase of self-definition began. As of this writing Hong Kong is five weeks into the largest, most civilized civil-disobedience movement it has ever seen, and there are no signs of its stopping any time soon. The fact that the leaderless uprising—by turns naive and courageous, buoyant and desperate—lacks a singular name is just one indication of its heterogeneous nature. Few things are certain at this stage except this: The rift the protests have exposed across age groups, income levels, and political affiliations will have a resounding impact on future generations.

2 LI YUAN-CHIA (TAIPEI FINE ARTS MUSEUM; CURATED BY MEI-CHING FANG WITH

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW at the special holiday rate of $45 a year—70% off the newsstand price. You’ll receive the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2014 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.