TABLE OF CONTENTS

POP! AFTER POP!: THE BATMAN TV SHOW

Batman, 1966–68, still from a TV show on ABC. Season 2, episode 11, “The Clock King’s Crazy Crimes.” Robin (Burt Ward) and Batman (Adam West).

The myths that actually touched you at that time—not Hercules, Orpheus,

Ulysses, and Aeneas—but Superman, Captain Marvel, Batman . . .


Tom Wolfe imagining Ken Kesey’s boyhood in post–World War II

America, in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (1968)

Camp was really being mass-marketed—everyone was in on the joke now.

Andy Warhol on the TV show Batman, in POPism: The Warhol ’60s (1980)

BUT WHAT WAS THE JOKE? And who was the Joker?

Loved and loathed beyond measure, the televised Batman (ABC, 1966–68) arrived sufficiently late in the day to recognize itself as a manufactured craze. The show, initially broadcast cliff-hanger style on successive evenings, Wednesdays and Thursdays at 7:30 PM, lasted only two and a half seasons—just a speed bump in Batman’s nearly eight-decade career—but its goofy lèse-majesté besmirched the durable icon forever.

Candy

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