TABLE OF CONTENTS

TOP TEN

Hanne Mugaas

Hanne Mugaas is the director and curator of Kunsthall Stavanger in Norway, where she has organized exhibitions by such artists as Judith Bernstein, Nicolas Party, and Torbjørn Rødland. This year, she will present projects with Sascha Braunig, Morten Norbye Halvorsen, and Jessica Warboys. Mugaas was a founder, with Fabienne Stephan, of the project space Art Since the Summer of ’69 in New York.

  1. SIRI AURDAL

    In the late 1960s, Siri Aurdal (b. 1937) made large-scale installations from fiberglass-armored polyester piping, a product developed in anticipation of the discovery of oil in Norway. In 1969, she used this new technology to create Omgivelser (Surroundings), an immersive sculpture on which visitors were invited to climb and write, at Kunstnernes Hus in Oslo. Aurdal hasn’t exhibited her work since 1980, but in March, Omgivelser will be re-created at Kunstnernes Hus, accompanied by a publication from Primary Information.

    *Siri Aurdal, _Omgivelser_ (Surroundings), 1969*, fiberglass-reinforced polyester. Installation view, Kunstnernes Hus, Oslo. Siri Aurdal, Omgivelser (Surroundings), 1969, fiberglass-reinforced polyester. Installation view, Kunstnernes Hus, Oslo.
  2. OLIA LIALINA AND DRAGAN ESPENSCHIED, ONE TERABYTE OF KILOBYTE AGE, 2011–

    David Bohnett and John Rezner launched the free Web-hosting service GeoCities—briefly called Beverly Hills Internet—in 1994. That same year, the last restrictions on online commercial traffic were lifted, and the Web was on its way to becoming a booming arena for free-ranging creativity. Soon, everyone and her dog had a website on GeoCities. The service was shuttered in 2009, but the Archive Team, a group of freelance preservationists, managed to save a large percentage of its websites. Shortly thereafter, artists and digital conservators Olia Lialina and Dragan Espenschied started piecing the GeoCities archive back together, presenting the treasure trove of their archaeological findings on their own research blog, One Terabyte of Kilobyte Age.

  3. RENATE MÜLLER’S THERAPEUTIC TOY ANIMALS

    Müller began designing and producing these toys as teaching tools for children with special needs in the early 1960s. Her handmade elephants, hippos, and whales debuted at the 1967 Leipzig Trade Fair and quickly found success with children at German psychiatric hospitals and clinics. Based in Sonneberg, Germany—an epicenter of toy manufacturing—Müller has continued her method of working (usually alone, in the studio) with the same materials (jute, wood, and leather), but she is constantly creating new designs.

    *Renate Müller, _Therapeutic Toy Double-Face Pony_, 2015*, jute, leather, 23 5/8 × 69 × 11 7/8". Photo: Joe Kramm. Renate Müller, Therapeutic Toy Double-Face Pony, 2015, jute, leather, 23 5/8 × 69 × 11 7/8". Photo: Joe Kramm.
  4. ALEX BAG’S DRAWINGS

    I am a longtime fan of Bag’s videos but was only recently made aware of an amazing series of drawings she made in 2009 for her show “Reality Tunnel Vision” at Elizabeth Dee in New York. Each work pictures a scene from among such inane reality-television shows as Charm School and Tool Academy. Most of the drawings’ acerbic titles reference Duchamp: Cunt Descending a Staircase/NYC Prep, The Large Gas/Tool Academy, Fountains/Rock of Love 2, and In Advance of the Broken Heart/Daisy of Love. And like Duchamp, Bag confronts the viewer with the question, Is this art, trash, a joke, or all of the above?

    *Alex Bag, _Cunt Descending a Staircase/NYC Prep_, 2009*, graphite on paper, 25 1/2 × 19 1/2". Alex Bag, Cunt Descending a Staircase/NYC Prep, 2009, graphite on paper, 25 1/2 × 19 1/2".
  5. ANNE TRUITT, DAYBOOK: THE JOURNAL OF AN ARTIST (PANTHEON, 1982)

    Spanning seven years, this journal is filled with Truitt’s reflections on her many roles: woman, artist, daughter, mother, and grandmother. She shows us how her domestic life informed and balanced her work, meditates on criticism and solitude, and relays the ways she struggled to express her vision. This generous account holds everyday activities up against the hard edges of Truitt’s abstract geometries and serves as a counterpoint to the clinical way canonical Minimalism is often contextualized.

  6. WENDY YAO AND OOGA BOOGA

    Everything Yao does is inspiring, but special mention goes out to her Los Angeles–based store/event space/publisher Ooga Booga and its presentation at the Swiss Institute’s Dark Fair in 2008: Yao sold objects, books, and cassette tapes from the inside of the coat she was wearing; her wares were hung there with safety pins and Velcro.

  7. TAMARA SHOPSIN, WHAT IS THIS? (THE ICE PLANT, 2015)

    This little book reminds us that “it’s never too early to learn about abstraction.” A series of drawings transforms the same scribble of abstract lines by changing its context: It appears variously as ice cream sitting on a cone, a bird’s nest, and the stench rising from a trash can. Needless to say, What Is This? is great fun for both toddlers and grown-ups. Besides making books, Tamara is a graphic designer and an illustrator; she’s also a chef at Shopsin’s, her family’s restaurant, which serves a great mac-and-cheese pancake from the most jam-packed menu in New York.

    *Spread from Tamara Shopsin’s _What Is This?_* (The Ice Plant, 2015). Spread from Tamara Shopsin’s What Is This? (The Ice Plant, 2015).
  8. BASTION

    Run by Alexandra Falagara and Brita Lindvall, Bastion is a design agency, studio, and lab in Stockholm that also hosts workshops and lectures. Their unorthodox 2012 redesign of the Swedish quarterly Bang is exceptional, but typical of the duo’s “norm-critical” strategies, which challenge visual stereotypes and modernist rules through feminist approaches to style, typography, and the grid.

    *Cover of _Bang_, no. 1, 2013.* Designed by Bastion. Cover of Bang, no. 1, 2013. Designed by Bastion.
  9. ART EDUCATION FOR CHILDREN

    I am a big proponent of the idea that contemporary art education should be introduced to kids as early and ambitiously as possible, which is why I highly respect artists who make it part of their work. A few disparate examples include Palle Nielsen’s playground-in-a-museum project The Model, which was mounted at Moderna Museet in Stockholm in 1968; Misaki Kawai’s cartoonlike interactive installation Love from Mt. Pom Pom at the Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York in 2012; and Christopher Kline’s ongoing series of performances and immersive installations “OK—The Musical,” 2014–.

    *Misaki Kawai, _Love from Mt. Pom Pom_, 2012*. Installation view, Children’s Museum of the Arts, New York. Photo: Alexa Hoyer. Misaki Kawai, Love from Mt. Pom Pom, 2012. Installation view, Children’s Museum of the Arts, New York. Photo: Alexa Hoyer.
  10. KIKI KOGELNIK

    In 1966, Kogelnik said, “I’m not involved with Coca-Cola . . . I’m involved in the technical beauty of rockets,” effectively distancing herself from Pop art. She was fascinated by the possibilities of the space age, with its new technologies and innovations in materials. Among my favorite works of hers are the series of vinyl sculptures she referred to as “Hangings”: flat, candy-colored cutouts—mostly life-size—of her family and friends (including one Claes Oldenburg). Though Kogelnik died in 1997, her feminist humor still resonates today.

    *Kiki Kogelnik in her studio, New York, 1965.* © Kiki Kogelnik Foundation. Kiki Kogelnik in her studio, New York, 1965. © Kiki Kogelnik Foundation.