TABLE OF CONTENTS

Peter Lindbergh

Peter Lindbergh, editorial photograph for “Angels,” Harper’s Bazaar, December 1993.

I WAS SHOCKED BY THE AMERICANS. The invasion of Conceptual artists like Joseph Kosuth, Lawrence Weiner, and Douglas Huebler hit me right after school (at the College of Art in Krefeld). Kosuth’s One and Three Chairs, 1965, with its powerful and simple message, fascinated me.

I was in my midtwenties, and had just read a very moving and in-depth essay by Klaus Honnef, one of the most interesting German art critics of the time, about Conceptual art. That essay turned everything I’d just learned about art upside down. As much as I was inspired and intrigued by the idea of Concept art, though, I hesitated to go in that direction with my own work, and decided to take some time to figure out how I wanted to continue. Kosuth and Weiner had ruined my quiet life as an artist!

Eight months later, I was still sitting around recovering when, totally by accident, I found out that a photographer

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the May 2016 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.