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Michael Ned Holte

View of “Henry Taylor,” 2016, Blum & Poe, Los Angeles. Wall, from left: yellow cap sunday, 2016; carolina miranda, 2016; fil’s house, 2016. Floor: Not Yet Titled, 2016. Photo: Joshua White.

1 HENRY TAYLOR (BLUM & POE, LOS ANGELES) Taylor’s blunt, compelling portraits wove together three spaces in which sculptures and found objects conjured archetypal Los Angeles tableaux: a blighted urban landscape, a pastoral pool scene, an artist’s studio. The whole evoked Courbet’s The Painter’s Studio: A Real Allegory Summing Up Seven Years of My Artistic and Moral Life, 1854–55, with the artist situated between rich and powerful benefactors on one side and the undercommons on the other. Taylor’s allegory is real, too. On the way to the gallery, I drove past the homeless guy in front of See’s Candies who looms large in Too Sweet, 2016, where he’s pictured holding a cardboard sign while giving Taylor an empathic gesture.

2 “NEW OBJECTIVITY: MODERN GERMAN ART IN THE WEIMAR REPUBLIC, 1919–1933” (LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART; CURATED BY STEPHANIE BARRON) Spooky how much Weimar

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