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CAROLINE MESQUITA

View of “Caroline Mesquita: Bal” (Ball), 2015, SpazioA, Pistoia, Italy. Photo: Rebecca Fanuele.

CAROLINE MESQUITA’S humanoid metal sculptures are a wild bunch. They like to dance and make mischief; they hump each other and have orgies; sometimes they get violent. In galleries, art centers, and, most delightfully, on top of a bar during a Paris art party in 2015, Mesquita’s copper and brass figures have presented a retro-futuristic vision of robots gone wild. Arranged into tableaux inspired equally by nineteenth-century French history paintings and the 1982 sci-fi classic Blade Runner, dramatically posed life-size bodies beckon the viewer, embrace one another, and lie collapsed on the floor. Mesquita’s stop-motion animated films (which she began making in 2016) bring her sculptures to life in a way that confirms the sybaritic behavior alluded to in these installations. On- screen, her creations jerkily interact with each other and with human characters, portrayed almost

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