TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIGHT HOUSES

Project Studio Piano & Rogers, Centre Pompidou, 1977, Paris. Sketch.

RENZO PIANO HAS DESIGNED more art museums than any other living architect. His compelling architectural language is recognizably his own but also elastic enough to adapt to all kinds of institutions, from the Centre Pompidou in Paris to the Art Institute of Chicago to his studio’s current projects in major cities on three continents. Here, as part of Artforum’s ongoing conversation series about museum architecture, senior editor Julian Rose speaks with Piano about the complexities of balancing art, light, and space. 

JULIAN ROSE: You are by far the most prolific museum designer in the world today. In retrospect, this affinity is somewhat surprising, because there was nothing about your education or early career that suggested a particularly close connection to visual art. Other architects who have become well known for museum design have gone to art school or spent formative years

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