previews

  • Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia, 1949.

    Henri Cartier-Bresson, Ubud, Bali, Indonesia, 1949.

    Henri Cartier-Bresson

    CaixaForum Barcelona
    Av. Francesc Ferrer i Guàrdia, 6-8
    September 15, 2003–January 5, 2004

    Gropius Bau
    Niederkirchnerstraße 7
    May 9–August 2, 2004

    Bibliothèque nationale de France (Richelieu)
    5, rue Vivienne
    May 1–July 27, 2003

    Palazzo Delle Esposizioni
    Via Nazionale 194
    September 30, 2004–January 15, 2005

    This is hardly curator Robert Delpire’s first Cartier-Bresson retrospective, and its singularity undoubtedly lies in the fifty years of friendship and collaboration between the world’s best-known living photographer and the legendary publisher, producer, and founding director of Paris’s Centre National de la Photographie, now director of the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson. Intended as a portrait of the man rather than a catalogue of the works, the exhibition includes little-known early photos, proofs, vintage prints, books, paintings, and drawings, and films by and about the photographer.

  • Richard Hamilton, Bathers I, 1966–67.

    Richard Hamilton, Bathers I, 1966–67.

    Richard Hamilton

    MACBA
    Placa dels Angels, 1
    July 19, 2013–June 1, 2003

    Museum Ludwig
    Heinrich-Böll-Platz
    June 12–November 9, 2003

    With Independent Group cohorts Lawrence Alloway, Peter and Alison Smithson, and Eduardo Paolozzi, Richard Hamilton organized the legendary 1956 exhibition “This is Tomorrow,” where he presented the collage that kicked off Pop art in the UK. That display and a number of key shows of his career have been reconstructed in this comprehensive retrospective, organized by the artist himself (with curator Vincente Todolí, director of Tate Modern) and bringing together some 180 works from 1938 to the present. A coproduction between Barcelona’s MACBA and the Museum Ludwig, the exhibition boasts a two-volume artist’s book/catalogue with essays by Laszlo Glozer, Hal Foster, and Sarat Maharaj.

  • Oppenheimer (still from a color digital video projection), 2003.

    Oppenheimer (still from a color digital video projection), 2003.

    Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle

    CaixaForum Barcelona
    Av. Francesc Ferrer i Guàrdia, 6-8
    May 9–July 27, 2003

    One of Madrid-born artist Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle’s greatest successes was his least noticeable—his design of the Whitney Museum of American Art’s 2001 Mies van der Rohe exhibition. His contribution made sense, since the artist continually reframes the legacy of midcentury modernism’s themes of science, industry, and globalism in such pieces as Le Baiser/The Kiss, 1999, a video in which the artist plays a window washer cleaning Mies’s Farnsworth House; and in Cloud Prototype No. 1, 2003, a titanium rendering of a cumulonimbus thundercloud. The latter was made using computerized machinery developed by the automotive industry, registering the impact of new technology on everyday life. Fittingly, this sixty-work show has a “science consultant” (Ivo Mesquita) but no curator.