Madrid

Hannah Höch, Grotesk, 1963, photomontage,  9 7⁄8 x 6 5⁄8".

Hannah Höch, Grotesk, 1963, photomontage, 9 7⁄8 x 6 5⁄8".

Madrid

Hannah Höch

Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía
Calle de Santa Isabel, 52
January 20–April 4, 2004

Hannah Höch was not a “good girl.” She was, as curator Juan Vicente Aliaga notes, a “total woman.” Staking her claim among the male Berlin Dada group with grotesque photomontage hybrids that critiqued stereotypical gender relations, Höch continued, until her death in 1978, to propose a heterogeneous approach to art. The nearly two hundred objects on view—spanning the five decades of her productive life and including photomontages and lesser-known paintings, watercolors, drawings, etchings, and dolls—attest to this; catalogue essays by Aliaga, Ralf Burmeister, Karoline Hille, and others address the entirety of Höch’s creativity. In any case, her arguments are as relevant to current debates on women’s identity as they were in 1920s Germany, when the New Woman first realized her dilemma.