previews

  • William Kentridge, Untitled (drawing for the film Tide Table), 2003, charcoal on paper, 31 1⁄2 x 47 1⁄4".

    William Kentridge, Untitled (drawing for the film Tide Table), 2003, charcoal on paper, 31 1⁄2 x 47 1⁄4".

    William Kentridge

    K20 Grabbeplatz
    Grabbeplatz 5
    March 27–May 31, 2004

    Johannesburg Art Gallery
    King George Street, Joubert Park
    July 1–October 31, 2005

    Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal
    185, rue Sainte-Catherine Ouest
    February 10–April 23, 2005

    Museum of Contemporary Art, Australia
    140 George Street The Rocks
    September 1–November 28, 2004

    Castello di Rivoli
    Piazza Mafalda di Savoia
    January 7–February 29, 2004

    Curated by Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev

    William Kentridge’s animated films and drawings are many things to many people: a principled eye on postapartheid South Africa, an exercise in medium-specificity, a rare expressive adult sensibility. This retrospective surveys all the Kentridges in one show. Older, politically oriented films evolve into recent works that push into formal issues of film and narrative. Most exciting is the debut of Tide Table (Eckstein on the beach?), a film that brings us into a South Africa haunted by AIDS. The catalogue features essays by South African writer Jane Taylor and others.

  • Carol Rama, Marta, 1940, watercolor on paper, 17 x 12 1⁄2".

    Carol Rama, Marta, 1940, watercolor on paper, 17 x 12 1⁄2".

    Carol Rama

    Museo d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea di Trento

    September 10–November 28, 2004

    Don't know yet

    January 1–January 2, 2005

    Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo
    Via Modane, 16
    March 8–June 6, 2004

    Curated by Guido Curto and Giorgio Verzotti

    Carol Rama might be Italy’s equivalent to Louise Bourgeois or Yayoi Kusama, only it’s taken longer for her to receive her proper recognition: At eighty-five, she was just awarded the Golden Lion at last year’s Venice Biennale and is now being given the most complete retrospective of her work to date, with 150 paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints from 1933 to the present. No wonder she’s said, “I don’t think there’s anyone in the world that’s been more pissed off than me.” Best known for the raw, violently erotic watercolors she began producing as a teenager, the Turin-born artist is equally adept at eliciting the sensuality of materials through abstraction. Don’t miss it.