previews

  • Martin Kippenberger, Keine braune Schokolade (No Brown Chocolate), 1994, oil on canvas, 70 7⁄8 x 59". © Estate Martin Kippenberger, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

    Martin Kippenberger, Keine braune Schokolade (No Brown Chocolate), 1994, oil on canvas, 70 7⁄8 x 59". © Estate Martin Kippenberger, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

    Martin Kippenberger

    Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen - K20
    Grabbeplatz 5
    June 10–September 16, 2006

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    February 8–May 7, 2006

    Curated by Doris Krystof and Jessica Morgan

    Martin's back! The massive Tate Modern is making room for the colossal Martin Kippenberger in a retrospective of more than two hundred works. Touchingly, The Happy End of Franz Kafka's “Amerika”, 1994, provides the show's center of gravity; Kafka's epic, like Kippenberger's retrospective, appeared posthumously. Although getting a grip on the artist's dizzying productivity can be like trying to grasp escaping butane, retrospectives decelerate the blur of life, making an oeuvre more legible. You even feel Kippenberger's breath in the catalogue essay his sister Susanne has written on, among other things, the playhouse the young artists called Martinsklause. Now, Tate Modern is Martinsklause II.

    Travels to K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, June 10–Sept. 16.

  • Zero

    Museum Kunstpalast
    Ehrenhof 4-5
    April 9–July 9, 2006

    Curated by Lorand Hegyi, Jean-Hubert Martin, Heike van den Valentyn, and Mattijs Visser

    Time again to revisit Group Zero? The concerns of this midcentury minimovement, which caught the current of early ’60s European investigations into “environments” and kineticism, seem to come under scrutiny every few years, but this exhibition promises something more than the usual retread of Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, and Günther Uecker. Instead, “Zero” looks at their influences (with some three hundred works by nearly fifty artists, from members of Gutaï to Pol Bury, Hans Haacke, Daniel Spoerri, and, of course, Yves Klein) and organizes the works largely according to theme (light, vibration, etc.). Whether the survey will conclusively define Group Zero remains to be seen, but it should at least contextualize its neo-Dada work.

    Travels to the Musée d’Art Moderne, Saint-Etienne, Sept. 15, 2006–Jan. 15, 2007.

  • “Museums in the 21st Century: Concepts, Projects, Buildings”

    Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz - Museum Modern Art Linz
    Ernst-Koref-Promenade 1
    November 23, 2006–February 19, 2007

    K20 Grabbeplatz
    Grabbeplatz 5
    March 31–June 25, 2006

    MAXXI - Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo
    Via Guido Reni 4A
    September 21–October 29, 2006

    Curated by Christine Gisi

    Some indication of the scale of the recent museum-construction spree may be gleaned from the fact that, for the second time in six years, the Art Centre Basel, an organizer of international traveling exhibitions, has mounted a showcase of contemporary museum design. Among the twenty-six projects documented in drawings, models, photographs, videos, and computer animation are Tadao Ando’s subterranean Chichu Art Museum in Naoshima, Japan, and the redevelopment of Berlin’s Museum Island. What are we going to put in all these new museums? As this show suggests, perhaps the museums themselves.

    Travels to Museo Nazionale delle Arti del XXI Secolo, Rome, Sept. 21–Oct. 29; Lentos Kunstmuseum Linz, Austria, Nov. 23, 2006–Feb. 19, 2007; and other venues.