Paris

Jean-Luc Godard, Weekend, 1967, still from a color film in 35 mm, 105 minutes. Corinne (Mireille Darc) and FLSO leader’s moll (Valérie Lagrange).

Jean-Luc Godard, Weekend, 1967, still from a color film in 35 mm, 105 minutes. Corinne (Mireille Darc) and FLSO leader’s moll (Valérie Lagrange).

Paris

Jean-Luc Godard

Centre Pompidou
Place Georges-Pompidou
April 26–August 14, 2006

Curated by Dominique Païni

How best to approach your own institutionalization when you’ve previously skewered no less a figure than Mick Jagger as a tool of the entertainment industry—the countercultural equivalent of a toothpaste salesman? Jean-Luc Godard rolls the dice in organizing his own career retrospective by moving beyond the museum’s usual theater-bound, film-program format reserved for celluloid luminaries to design nine galleries, each devoted to a single theme (unannounced at press time). The French auteur, who turned seventy-five last year, has made seven new short films for the occasion to boot. A suitably risky crowning event for the director whose 1967 movie Weekend declared itself “a film found on a scrapheap.”