previews

  • David Smith

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    October 4, 2006–January 3, 2007

    Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum | New York
    1071 Fifth Avenue
    February 3–May 14, 2006

    Centre Pompidou
    Place Georges-Pompidou
    June 14–September 11, 2006

    Curated by Carmen Giménez

    In 1966, less than a year after David Smith's death, Clement Greenberg reflected on the artist on whom he had pinned his hopes for the “new sculpture”: “His oeuvre, in all its unevenness and sprawl, in all its bewildering diversity, somehow remains open, unfinished.” With 122 sculptures—from the wiry welded constructions of the '30s through the later volumetric totems—this exhibition commemorating the centenary of Smith's birth should mirror that “bewildering diversity.” Dozens of drawings and the artist's notebooks, which suggest their maker's thematic and intellectual sympathies, round out the selection. Curated by the Guggenheim's Carmen Giménez, the show is accompanied by a mammoth scholarly catalogue nearly as heavy as one of Smith's sculptures.

    Travels to the Centre Pompidou, Paris, June 14–Sept.11; Tate Modern, London, Oct. 4, 2006–Jan. 3, 2007.

  • David Hockney, Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy, 1970-71, acrylic paint on canvas, 84 1/4 x 120".

    David Hockney, Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy, 1970-71, acrylic paint on canvas, 84 1/4 x 120".

    David Hockney

    Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
    465 Huntington Avenue
    February 26–May 14, 2006

    National Portrait Gallery
    St. Martin's Place
    July 19, 2013–January 21, 2007

    Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)
    5905 Wilshire Boulevard
    June 11–September 4, 2006

    Curated by Sarah Howgate and Barbara Stern Shapiro

    One cannot trace the history of Pop art without visiting David Hockney's pastel-and-Polaroid-strewn studio. The British-born, Los Angeles-based artist helped pioneer the movement in the '06s, though his work—particularly his portraiture—is imbued with a warm intimacy distinct from the mass-market flash embraced by his Pop peers. Co-organized by London's National Portrait Gallery, this exhibition dives into Hockney's output, through 162 portraits spanning fifty years that show Hockney's relatives, lovers, and celebrity friends in their swimming pools and failing relationships. The eccentric painter himself, blond and bespectacld, appears in a section of self-portraits.

  • “Tropicália: A Revolution in Brazilian Culture”

    Centro Cultural de Belém
    Praça do Império
    July 1–September 1, 2006

    Barbican Art Gallery
    Barbican Centre Silk Street
    February 15–May 21, 2006

    Bronx Museum of the Arts
    1040 Grand Concourse
    October 14, 2006–January 28, 2007

    Curated by Carlos Basualdo

    “Tropicália,” the poet Torquato Neto wrote, “is whatever is necessary.” We should get a sense of just how exhilarating “whatever” can be in this exhibition, which presents some 250 works produced during the influential Brazilian cultural movement of the late '60s. These are shown alongside contemporary responses by Marepe, Karin Schneider, and nine others. Highlights include Hélio Oiticica's seminal environment Eden, 1969, and television footage from 1968 of Os Mutantes singing in plastic suits. Accompanied by a catalogue containing an anthology of period texts, the show, co-organized by the MCA Chicago and the Bronx Museum, argues that being slippery can also be extremely smart.

    Travels to Centro Cultural de Belém, Lisbon, July–Sept.; Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York, Oct. 14, 2006–Jan. 28, 2007; and other venues.

  • Martin Kippenberger, Keine braune Schokolade (No Brown Chocolate), 1994, oil on canvas, 70 7⁄8 x 59". © Estate Martin Kippenberger, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

    Martin Kippenberger, Keine braune Schokolade (No Brown Chocolate), 1994, oil on canvas, 70 7⁄8 x 59". © Estate Martin Kippenberger, Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.

    Martin Kippenberger

    Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen - K20
    Grabbeplatz 5
    June 10–September 16, 2006

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    February 8–May 7, 2006

    Curated by Doris Krystof and Jessica Morgan

    Martin's back! The massive Tate Modern is making room for the colossal Martin Kippenberger in a retrospective of more than two hundred works. Touchingly, The Happy End of Franz Kafka's “Amerika”, 1994, provides the show's center of gravity; Kafka's epic, like Kippenberger's retrospective, appeared posthumously. Although getting a grip on the artist's dizzying productivity can be like trying to grasp escaping butane, retrospectives decelerate the blur of life, making an oeuvre more legible. You even feel Kippenberger's breath in the catalogue essay his sister Susanne has written on, among other things, the playhouse the young artists called Martinsklause. Now, Tate Modern is Martinsklause II.

    Travels to K21 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, June 10–Sept. 16.

  • Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781, oil on canvas, 40 1/4 x 50". From “Gothic Nightmares.”

    Henry Fuseli, The Nightmare, 1781, oil on canvas, 40 1/4 x 50". From “Gothic Nightmares.”

    “Gothic Nightmares: Fuseli, Blake and the Romantic Imagination”

    Tate Britain
    Millbank
    February 15–May 1, 2006

    Curated by Martin Myrone

    This show promises to be an educational Halloween party. With 160 works, it explores the demons, witches, and elves imagined by two dozen high-minded British visionaries and considers such popular entertainments as “Phantasmagoria,” which offered nineteenth-century Londoners a preview of the modern horror film, complete with grisly slide shows and creepy sounds. This rich territory was a core ingredient in the Romantic imagination, which, from the 1760s on, expanded into an ever-more irrational world. Here, the focus is on the odd couple of Swiss-born Henry Fuseli, with his crowd-pleasing Nightmare, 1781, and William Blake, whose depictions of monsters and phantoms were inspired by the loftiest pages of the Bible and Dante.

  • Ugo Rondinone, Hell, Yes!, 2001, installation view, fa Projects, London.

    Ugo Rondinone, Hell, Yes!, 2001, installation view, fa Projects, London.

    Ugo Rondinone

    Whitechapel Gallery
    77 - 82 Whitechapel High Street
    January 24–March 26, 2006

    Curated by David Thorp

    Notorious for his extended sequence of abstract “target” paintings and for a questionable predilection for clowns, “multidisciplinary romantic” Ugo Rondinone generates dreamlike juxtapositions of the prosaic and the improbable that critic Elizabeth Janus has aptly dubbed “parallel realities.” For his first major exhibition in the UK, the Swiss artist has produced two atmospheric environments comprising a total of twenty-four recent paintings and sculptures, nine of which are new. Moodily gothic in tone, the larger of the two installations is laid out around a vast labyrinth of reflective black Perspex and accompanied by an audio recording of a repetitive dialogue about an impending breakup. Alison Gingeras, Gilda Williams, and independent curator David Thorp contribute essays to the catalogue.

  • “Modernism: Designing a New World, 1914-1939”

    Marta Herford
    Goebenstrasse 2-10
    September 16, 2006–January 7, 2007

    Victoria and Albert Museum
    Cromwell Road
    April 6–July 23, 2006

    Curated by Christopher Wilk

    For some die-hards, Modernism with a capital M may still be a religion of absolute truth and beauty, but for the rest of us (especially antique dealers) it's become as much a period style as Second Empire or Art Nouveau. Fraught with the historical nostalgia of a long-lost utopian dream, the movement can now seem as quaint and precious as Bakelite and glass brick, which means it's high time for an all-embracing retrospective. This one not only extends as far afield as Japan, Brazil, and Israel but mixes the exalted heights of Mondrian and Mies van der Rohe with 350 more-earthbound examples of graphic design, furniture, photography, painting, film, and costume. In short, it is a poignant time capsule of the myth of progress forever destroyed by World War II.

    Travels to MARTa Herford, Germany, Sept. 16, 2006–Jan. 7, 2007.

  • Howard Hodgkin

    IMMA - Irish Museum of Modern Art
    Royal Hospital Kilmainham Military Road
    February 22–May 7, 2006

    Tate Britain
    Millbank
    June 15–September 17, 2006

    Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía
    Calle de Santa Isabel, 52
    October 18, 2006–January 8, 2007

    Curated by Enrique Juncosa and Nicholas Serota

    Howard Hodgkin once called a painting After Vuillard; the title sums up much of what some admire about his work as well as what leaves others so indifferent: the echoes of École de Paris intimism and an Epicurean redeployment of stylistic features abstracted not just from Vuillard but also from Bonnard and Matisse. Yet he offers more than an exquisite rehash: Hodgkin takes crazy chances with color, laying it down with such an unlikely mix of subtlety and bravura that he’s never boring. This survey, comprising some sixty works from 1960 through today, is accompanied by the anthology Writers on Howard Hodgkin; these literati may not know much about art, so look avidly but read with a dash of salt.

    Travels to Tate Britain, London, June 15–Sept. 17; Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid, Oct. 18, 2006–Jan. 8, 2007.

  • Pierre Huyghe, This is not a time for dreaming, 2004, still from a color film in 16 mm transferred to DVD, 24 minutes.

    Pierre Huyghe, This is not a time for dreaming, 2004, still from a color film in 16 mm transferred to DVD, 24 minutes.

    Pierre Huyghe

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    July 5–September 24, 2006

    Musée d'Art Moderne de Paris
    11 avenue du Président Wilson
    February 2–April 23, 2006

    Curated by Laurence Bossé, Julia Garimorth, and Hans-Ulrich Obrist

    After visiting the Antarctic Circle last year, Parisian hometown-boy-made-good Pierre Huyghe explores a terra incognita closer at hand: the “virgin” territory of the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris’s newly refurbished exhibition space. To celebrate its reopening after a two-year renovation, the museum presents five projects from Huyghe, whose last significant outing there was a 1998 group exhibition with Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and Philippe Parreno. The Antarctic voyage, along with its orchestral pendant filmed last fall in New York’s Central Park, provides the basis for ambitious new installations, which are presented alongside a film of the Le Corbusier–inspired puppet musical commissioned by Harvard’s Fogg Art Museum in 2004.

    Travels to Tate Modern, London, July 5–Sept. 24.

  • “Inner Worlds Outside”

    IMMA - Irish Museum of Modern Art
    Royal Hospital Kilmainham Military Road
    July 25–October 1, 2006

    Whitechapel Gallery
    77 - 82 Whitechapel High Street
    April 26–July 2, 2006

    CaixaForum Barcelona
    Av. Francesc Ferrer i Guàrdia, 6-8
    January 26–April 2, 2006

    Curated by Monica Kinley and Jon Thompson

    Jean Dubuffet’s coinage “art brut” has an antiquated ring, and “outsider art” was a suspect term even before the oeuvre of Chicago janitor and Vivian Girls visionary Henry Darger became a posthumous blockbuster. Eschewing either designation, curators Thompson and Kinley (the latter is director of the Musgrave Kinley Outsider Art Collection) organize their selection of 150 works thematically rather than according to the backgrounds of the artists. Dream-weavers Ensor, Guston, Klee, and Pollock share space with Darger, Michael the Cartographer, farm laborer J. B. Murray, and others under such rubrics as “Imaginary Landscapes,” “Fantastic Cities,” “Impossible Architecture,” “Desire and the Erotic Body,” and “Physiognomic Hauntings.”

    Travels to the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, Apr. 26–July 2; Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, July 25–Oct. 1.