previews

  • David Smith

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    October 4, 2006–January 3, 2007

    Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum | New York
    1071 Fifth Avenue
    February 3–May 14, 2006

    Centre Pompidou
    Place Georges-Pompidou
    June 14–September 11, 2006

    Curated by Carmen Giménez

    In 1966, less than a year after David Smith's death, Clement Greenberg reflected on the artist on whom he had pinned his hopes for the “new sculpture”: “His oeuvre, in all its unevenness and sprawl, in all its bewildering diversity, somehow remains open, unfinished.” With 122 sculptures—from the wiry welded constructions of the '30s through the later volumetric totems—this exhibition commemorating the centenary of Smith's birth should mirror that “bewildering diversity.” Dozens of drawings and the artist's notebooks, which suggest their maker's thematic and intellectual sympathies, round out the selection. Curated by the Guggenheim's Carmen Giménez, the show is accompanied by a mammoth scholarly catalogue nearly as heavy as one of Smith's sculptures.

    Travels to the Centre Pompidou, Paris, June 14–Sept.11; Tate Modern, London, Oct. 4, 2006–Jan. 3, 2007.

  • Pierre Huyghe, This is not a time for dreaming, 2004, still from a color film in 16 mm transferred to DVD, 24 minutes.

    Pierre Huyghe, This is not a time for dreaming, 2004, still from a color film in 16 mm transferred to DVD, 24 minutes.

    Pierre Huyghe

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    July 5–September 24, 2006

    Musée d'Art Moderne de Paris
    11 avenue du Président Wilson
    February 2–April 23, 2006

    Curated by Laurence Bossé, Julia Garimorth, and Hans-Ulrich Obrist

    After visiting the Antarctic Circle last year, Parisian hometown-boy-made-good Pierre Huyghe explores a terra incognita closer at hand: the “virgin” territory of the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris’s newly refurbished exhibition space. To celebrate its reopening after a two-year renovation, the museum presents five projects from Huyghe, whose last significant outing there was a 1998 group exhibition with Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster and Philippe Parreno. The Antarctic voyage, along with its orchestral pendant filmed last fall in New York’s Central Park, provides the basis for ambitious new installations, which are presented alongside a film of the Le Corbusier–inspired puppet musical commissioned by Harvard’s Fogg Art Museum in 2004.

    Travels to Tate Modern, London, July 5–Sept. 24.

  • Jean-Luc Godard, Weekend, 1967, still from a color film in 35 mm, 105 minutes. Corinne (Mireille Darc) and FLSO leader’s moll (Valérie Lagrange).

    Jean-Luc Godard, Weekend, 1967, still from a color film in 35 mm, 105 minutes. Corinne (Mireille Darc) and FLSO leader’s moll (Valérie Lagrange).

    Jean-Luc Godard

    Centre Pompidou
    Place Georges-Pompidou
    April 26–August 14, 2006

    Curated by Dominique Païni

    How best to approach your own institutionalization when you’ve previously skewered no less a figure than Mick Jagger as a tool of the entertainment industry—the countercultural equivalent of a toothpaste salesman? Jean-Luc Godard rolls the dice in organizing his own career retrospective by moving beyond the museum’s usual theater-bound, film-program format reserved for celluloid luminaries to design nine galleries, each devoted to a single theme (unannounced at press time). The French auteur, who turned seventy-five last year, has made seven new short films for the occasion to boot. A suitably risky crowning event for the director whose 1967 movie Weekend declared itself “a film found on a scrapheap.”

  • Juergen Teller

    Fondation Cartier Pour l'Art Contemporain
    261 boulevard Raspail
    March 4–May 21, 2006

    Curated by Hervé Chandès and Leanne Sacramone

    To fashion consumptives, Juergen Teller is best known for his Marc Jacobs–inspired collaborations with the likes of Cindy Sherman and Charlotte Rampling. And while Teller is not alone in raising the stakes in the conceptual project of disguising art as commerce, his ability to create images whose brutality, tenderness, humor, and seriousness endure regardless of context signals a unique and singular vision. His first major show in France comprises some eighty photographs. Expect to find iconic images of Yves Saint Laurent and Kate Moss alongside prints of weeds poking out of Albert Speer’s Nuremberg ruins. Whether advertising handbags or the bloat of hubris, Teller’s work charts a moral and conceptual decadence redeemed by searing honesty and impolite beauty.