previews

  • Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Black & Cream Butterfly) (detail), 2005, colored pencil on paper, 62 1/2 x 48“. From ”Gone Formalism."

    Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Black & Cream Butterfly) (detail), 2005, colored pencil on paper, 62 1/2 x 48“. From ”Gone Formalism."

    “Gone Formalism”

    Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania
    University of Pennsylvania 118 South 36th Street
    January 21–March 26, 2006

    Curated by Jenelle Porter

    Can't we call it something else? “Formalism” may be a lost cause, with its connoted rejection of anything personal, social, imagined, or weird. Yet relations between front and back, inside and outside, material fact and illusion, structure and image continue to compel many of the best artists working today. Jenelle Porter, in her first show for the ICA, tackles the way formalism still resonates by focusing on six artists: Charles Long, Evan Holloway, Mark Grotjahn, Liz Larner, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, and Gitte Schäfer. Her selection of thirty sculptures, paintings, drawings, and installations by these practitioners hints at the possibilities of infusing the optical raptures of formalisms past with humor and brains. These “formalists” seem more the children of Tuttle and Hammons than of Olitski and Frankenthaler.

  • “Make Your Own Life: Artists In & Out of Cologne”

    Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania
    University of Pennsylvania 118 South 36th Street
    April 21–July 31, 2006

    Curated by Bennett Simpson

    The “Cologne effect” of the '80s may have had less to do with artistic innovation than with marketing, packaging, and attitude, but its result was spectacular: The modest-size city on the Rhine emerged not only as the art capital of West Germany but as the most important center for contemporary art outside New York. “Make Your Own Life” maps the mythical surroundings of the late Martin Kippenberger and his excessive friends, many still based in the city. Positioning art production in a broader cultural context, the show presents nearly forty paintings, sculptures, installations, photographs, and videos alongside less-exhibited projects (records, publications, posters, and invitation cards). Among the thirty-odd artists included are Kai Althoff, Cosima von Bonin, and Michael Krebber, as well as Americans like Mike Kelley and Andrea Fraser.

  • Artur Barrio

    The Galleries at Moore
    1916 Race Street (on the Parkway) Moore College of Art & Design
    February 8–March 19, 2006

    Curated by Brian Wallace

    In 1970, during one of the most violent periods of Brazil’s military dictatorship, Artur Barrio left plastic bags filled with meat, bones, excrement, and garbage on the streets of Rio de Janeiro, while an accomplice photographed passersby, capturing their curious, repulsed, and horrified reactions. For Barrio’s first solo exhibition in North America, curator Brian Wallace offers an unprecedented opportunity to view these and other photographs alongside some seventy objects, drawings, notebooks, and documentary material from the late ’60s to the present, including a new project that incorporates elements (coffee grounds, lightbulbs, wall writings) from Barrio’s Documenta11 installation. The show is accompanied by a symposium featuring the artist and international curators like Carlos Basualdo and Cristina Freire, as well as a catalogue with new translations of Barrio’s writings.