previews

  • Klee and America

    The Menil Collection
    1533 Sul Ross Street
    October 6, 2006–January 14, 2007

    Neue Galerie New York
    1048 Fifth Avenue
    March 9–May 22, 2006

    The Phillips Collection
    1600 21st Street NW
    June 16–September 10, 2006

    Curated by Josef Helfenstein

    Walter Benjamin famously interpreted Klee's Angelus Novus, 1920, as a figure that turns toward the past while history pushes forward. Similarly, “Klee and America” (organized by Josef Helfenstein, director of the Menil Collection) builds on the success of MoMA's 1987 retrospective and the collection-specific “Paul Klee at the Guggenheim Museum” in 1993, while shedding new light on the Swiss painter's legacy in the US. Through more than sixty oil paintings, watercolors, and drawings, as well as documentary material on influential collectors like Alfred Barr and Galka Scheyer, the exhibition focuses on the artist's increasing popularity in America during the late '30s and '40s, after Hitler's campaign against “degenerate” art caused the European market for his work to collapse.

    Travels to the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, June 16–Sept. 10; Menil Collection, Houston, Oct. 6, 2006–Jan. 14, 2007.

  • William Wegman, Connector, 1994, color photograph, 24 x 20".

    William Wegman, Connector, 1994, color photograph, 24 x 20".

    William Wegman

    Addison Gallery of American Art
    Phillips Academy 3 Chapel Avenue
    April 7–July 31, 2007

    Brooklyn Museum
    200 Eastern Parkway
    March 10–May 28, 2006

    Norton Museum of Art
    1451 South Olive Avenue
    November 4, 2006–January 28, 2007

    Smithsonian American Art Museum
    8th and F Streets NW
    July 4–September 24, 2006

    Curated by Trevor Fairbrother

    Since 1970, William Wegman has marketed himself and his kennel of canine celebrities so well (and so far outside the precincts of contemporary art) that it's hard to formulate a critical take. But here are three attempts: (1) Wegman is a canny critical artist, the most literal (mis)reader of Smithson's site/non-site dialectic yet; (2) he's learned Warhol's “business art” model all too well; (3) he'd be nowhere without the adorable pooches, the most famous in America since Benji. Through more than 260 photographs, drawings, paintings, collages, books, and videos from 1968 to today, this show, organized by the Addison Gallery, may show which description fits. Now go chase the ball.

    Travels to the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, July 4–Sept. 24; Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, FL, Nov. 4, 2006–Jan. 28, 2007; Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, MA, Apr. 7–July 31, 2007.

  • Paul Cézanne, Pigeonnier de Bellevue (Dovecote at Bellevue), 1899-90, oil on canvas, 25 1/4 x 31 1/2". From “Cézanne in Provence.”

    Paul Cézanne, Pigeonnier de Bellevue (Dovecote at Bellevue), 1899-90, oil on canvas, 25 1/4 x 31 1/2". From “Cézanne in Provence.”

    Cézanne in Provence

    Musée Granet

    June 9–September 17, 2006

    National Gallery of Art
    Sixth Street and Constitution Avenue, NW
    January 29–May 7, 2006

    Curated by Philip Conisbee and Denis Coutagne

    In 1990 Giselda Pollock asked, “What can we say about Cézanne these days?” Now, on the centenary of the canonical artist's death, “Cézanne in Provence” should give us plenty to talk about. Organized by Philip Conisbee of the National Gallery and Denis Coutagne of the Musée Granet, this exhibition comprises 118 oil paintings, watercolors, and lithographs made by the artist in his native Provence, including depictions of the Mediterranean coast at L'Estaque, Mont Sainte-Victoire, and the Chateâu Noir. The show is a major component of the French region's “Cézanne 2006” tribute, which involves the reopening of the Musée Granet (closed for renovation since 2003) and the opening of several key sites in Cézanne's life, like his family home in Aix-en-Provence and his work cottage in the Bibémus quarry.

    Travels to the Musée Granet, Aix-en-Provence, June 9–Sept. 17.

  • Katherine S. Dreier, Zwei Welten (Two Worlds), 1930, oil on canvas, 281⁄4 x 36 1⁄8". From “The Société Anonyme.”

    Katherine S. Dreier, Zwei Welten (Two Worlds), 1930, oil on canvas, 281⁄4 x 36 1⁄8". From “The Société Anonyme.”

    “The Société Anonyme: Modernism for America”

    Dallas Museum of Art
    1717 North Harwood
    June 10–September 16, 2007

    Hammer Museum
    10899 Wilshire Boulevard
    April 23–August 20, 2006

    The Phillips Collection
    1600 21st Street NW
    October 14, 2006–January 21, 2007

    Curated by Susan Greenberg and Jennifer R. Gross

    Founded in 1920 on East 47th Street in New York by Katherine S. Dreier, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray, the Société Anonyme amassed one of the most impressive collections of modern art in the US. Created to educate the public about modern art and to support emerging artists, the “experimental museum”'s acquisition program and reference library existed at a time when no institution in America was collecting or supporting contemporary work. This show features some two hundred pieces from the collection (housed since 1941 at the Yale University Art Gallery, which organized the show) by Arthur Dove, Ernst, Kandinsky, Léger, Picasso, Schwitters, and more.Travels to the Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Oct. 14, 2006–Jan. 21, 2007; Dallas Museum of Art, June 10–Sept. 16, 2007; and other venues.