previews

  • Hélio Oiticica

    The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
    1001 Bissonnet
    December 10, 2006–April 1, 2007

    Tate Modern
    Bankside
    June 7–September 3, 2007

    Curated by Mari Carmen Ramírez

    Although the importance of Hélio Oiticica’s contribution to the ’60s-era dismantling of autonomous art is increasingly acknowledged, firsthand experience in North America of the Brazilian’s work remains largely restricted to a single series: his multisensory installations, the “Quasi-cinemas.” But now, “The Body of Color”—the first phase of a multiyear collaboration between the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and Rio de Janeiro’s Projeto Hélio Oiticica—presents the broad scope of the artist’s creative experimentation. Foregrounding color’s central role in Oiticica’s practice, the show comprises more than two hundred works, including late-’50s Neo-concrete monochromes and mid-’60s and ’70s Parangolés—bright samba costumes that liberated color from the aesthetic realm into the domain of lived experience. Travels to Tate Modern, London, June 7–Sept. 3, 2007.

  • Pierre Klossowski, Roberte agressée par les esprits qu'elle a censurés (Roberta Attacked by the Spirits She Had Censured), 1976, colored pencil on paper, 63 3/4 x 43 5/16".

    Pierre Klossowski, Roberte agressée par les esprits qu'elle a censurés (Roberta Attacked by the Spirits She Had Censured), 1976, colored pencil on paper, 63 3/4 x 43 5/16".

    Pierre Klossowski

    Museum Ludwig
    Heinrich-Böll-Platz
    December 22, 2006–March 18, 2007

    Whitechapel Gallery
    77 - 82 Whitechapel High Street
    September 20–November 19, 2006

    Centre Pompidou
    Place Georges-Pompidou
    April 2–June 4, 2007

    Curated by Sarah Wilson

    Pierre Klossowski (1905–2001) remains best known for his literary and philosophical activities. The founder, with Marie Bonaparte and Dr. René Laforgue, of the Paris Psychoanalytic Society, Klossowski was an active collaborator in the Collège de Sociologie (with Georges Bataille, Roger Caillois, et al.), and his 1947 theological study, Sade mon prochaine, is a classic, while his many novels enjoy a devoted coterie. Nevertheless, Klossowski’s delicate and perverse drawings remain marginalia in the history of Surrealism, in part because his allegorical, erotic art has been overshadowed by the fame of his younger brother, Balthus. The museums present some forty large-scale drawings and sculptures from 1952 to 1990 as well as films and related materials, complicating our perception of an already slippery figure. Travels to the Museum Ludwig, Cologne, Dec. 22, 2006-Mar. 18, 2007; Centre Pompidou, Paris, Apr. 2-June 4, 2007.

  • Jake and Dinos Chapman, Disasters of War IV, 2001, one of 83 hand-colored etchings with watercolor, each 9 5/8 x 13 9/16.

    Jake and Dinos Chapman, Disasters of War IV, 2001, one of 83 hand-colored etchings with watercolor, each 9 5/8 x 13 9/16.

    Jake and Dinos Chapman

    Tate Liverpool
    Albert Dock
    December 15, 2006–March 4, 2007

    Curated by Tanya Barson and Christoph Grunenberg

    One putatively verboten move after another, executed with fastidiousness and glee—that’s Jake and Dinos Chapman’s modus operandi. Retrofitting reverenced subjects with insolent supplements—such as giving child mannequins sexual organs for facial features, defacing original Goya prints in comically juvenile fashion, and creating faux-ethnographic displays with hand-carved McDonald’s logos—underscores the artists’ superiority to the scopophiliac hordes via fanatical attention to detail. The conspicuous void in this midcareer survey falls where the British brothers’ concentration camp–themed masterpiece, Hell, 1999–2000, should be (it was destroyed in the 2004 Momart fire). But the seventeen sculptures, two installations, and some three hundred paintings and prints made since 1992 will no doubt still offer a brilliantly assaulting display and a measure of our societal hang-ups.