previews

  • René Magritte, Decalomania, 1966, oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 39 3/8". ©  Charly Herscovici, ARS, New York, 2006.

    René Magritte, Decalomania, 1966, oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 39 3/8". © Charly Herscovici, ARS, New York, 2006.

    “Magritte and Contemporary Art: The Treachery of Images”

    Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)
    5905 Wilshire Boulevard
    November 19, 2006–March 4, 2007

    Curated by Stephanie Barron and Michel Draguet

    A literal-turned-figurative sign painter, René Magritte surely predicted Pop, and his infamous inscription on canvas, CECI N’EST PAS UNE PIPE, foresaw the wordy indexical play of Conceptual art. Borrowing its subtitle from that influential 1929 canvas, which is owned by LACMA, and placing the piece at the center of sixty-five of the Belgian Surrealist’s visual conundrums and just as many works by thirty-one contemporary artists, this exhibition seeks to unveil Magritte’s pervasive influence. In addition to major players (Johns, Lichtenstein, Ruscha, Kosuth, and Koons), the show will include such disparate characters as Richard Artschwager, Vija Celmins, and Jim Shaw—all arguably under the spell of Magritte’s trippy trompe l’oeil tricks.

  • “Skin + Bones: Parallel Practices in Fashion and Architecture”

    MOCA Geffen Contemporary
    152 North Central Avenue
    November 26, 2006–March 5, 2007

    Curated by Brooke Hodge

    Fashion and architecture intersect most explicitly at the site of the retail store (think Rem Koolhaas’s 2001 Prada flagship in New York). But this exhibition, contrary to the lack of substance suggested by its title, “Skin + Bones,” jettisons consumerism for a meatier conceptual approach: Both fashion and architecture conform to the human body and amplify the prescribed social identities they cover. Occupying the entire museum with scores of preparatory works, photographs, and garments, the show focuses on forty-six architects and designers who, since 1980, have rhymed one another visually or theoretically—like Hussein Chalayan, whose white tulle dress from spring 2000 mirrors the silhouette of Shigeru Ban’s 1995 Curtain Wall House. Themes range from identity to shared “tectonic strategies” (folding, draping, wrapping).

  • Allan Kaprow, Days Off: A Calendar of Happenings, 1968, photo offset on newsprint, staples, and shrink-wrap, 10 1/2 x 15 3/8". © Hauser and Wirth Zürich London.

    Allan Kaprow, Days Off: A Calendar of Happenings, 1968, photo offset on newsprint, staples, and shrink-wrap, 10 1/2 x 15 3/8". © Hauser and Wirth Zürich London.

    Allan Kaprow

    Van Abbemuseum
    Bilderdijklaan 10
    July 24, 2013–April 22, 2007

    MOCA Geffen Contemporary
    152 North Central Avenue
    June 1–September 1, 2007

    Haus der Kunst
    Prinzregentenstrasse 1
    October 18, 2006–January 21, 2007

    Curated by Eva Meyer-Hermann and Stephanie Rosenthal

    Museums may always struggle with how to exhibit or reinvent the works of Allan Kaprow, especially since his death last May. The irreconcilability of museum settings and works intended to be enacted in the everyday world remains central to Kaprow’s example. The Haus der Kunst and the Van Abbemuseum, in an ambitious retrospective of the artist’s career and an examination of his influence, will practice both display and enactment. In addition to the re-creation of environments, sound pieces, and happenings, including the seminal 18 Happenings in Six Parts, 1959, the show comprises collages, assemblages, and paintings as well as scores, texts, activity booklets, and correspondence. Travels to the Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands, Feb. 10-Apr. 22, 2007; Kunsthalle Bern, spring 2007; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, summer 2008.