San Francisco

Douglas Gordon, Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now. To be seen on monitors, some with headphones, others run silently, and all simultaneously, 1992–. Installation view, National Galleries of Scotland, Royal Scottish Academy Building, Edinburgh, 2007. Photo: Antonia Reeve.

Douglas Gordon, Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now. To be seen on monitors, some with headphones, others run silently, and all simultaneously, 1992–. Installation view, National Galleries of Scotland, Royal Scottish Academy Building, Edinburgh, 2007. Photo: Antonia Reeve.

San Francisco

Douglas Gordon

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)
151 Third Street
October 27, 2007–February 24, 2008

Curated by Rudolf Frieling

Transparent WYSIWYG titles are one powerful layer of Douglas Gordon’s deceptively straight-faced, open-ended practice. His 24 Hour Psycho, 1993, is just that: the Hitchcock film extended to the length of a day. A wonderfully imposing work that wrestles with cinema, memory, and madness, it is impossible to watch fully, owing to its time-based extreme. Ditto for his ongoing, self-reflective metawork Pretty much every film and video work from about 1992 until now. To be seen on monitors, some with headphones, others run silently, and all simultaneously. For this compact fifteen-year retrospective, making its US debut, curator Rudolf Frieling marshals nearly fifty of Gordon’s films and videos—including Monster, 1996; Play Dead; Real Time, 2003; and Trigger Finger, 1994—on as many monitors, into a single gallery. Think of it as an onslaught, a Gordon crash course, or a glorious exercise in mind-altering media overload. It’s all and none of the above.