Los Angeles

Eva Hesse, H+H, 1965, varnish, ink, gouache, enamel, cord, metal, wood, papier-mâché, unknown modeling compound, particle board, and wood, 27 x 27 1/2 x 4 7/8".

Eva Hesse, H+H, 1965, varnish, ink, gouache, enamel, cord, metal, wood, papier-mâché, unknown modeling compound, particle board, and wood, 27 x 27 1/2 x 4 7/8".

Los Angeles

“Oranges and Sardines: Conversations on Abstract Painting”

Hammer Museum
10899 Wilshire Boulevard
November 9, 2008–February 8, 2009

Curated by Gary Garrels

Few have managed to render the light anxiety of artistic sublimation with such comedic facticity as Frank O’Hara did in his 1957 poem “Why I Am Not a Painter,” a New York School parable in which the sources of one’s inspiration—here, sardines and the color orange—are shown to be always right there in the artwork (and also not). Acknowledging this conundrum, contemporary artists Mark Grotjahn, Wade Guyton, Mary Heilmann, Amy Sillman, Charline von Heyl, and Christopher Wool pair their own canvases at the Hammer with those of the earlier figures (Klee, De Kooning, Gonzalez-Torres, and Guston among them) who they say influenced them most. An accompanying catalogue is to feature an essay by curator Gary Garrels and extended interviews with the artists. Will they avoid the subject?