previews

  • Ceal Floyer, Overgrowth, 2004, medium-format slide, medium-format slide projector, dimensions variable.

    Ceal Floyer

    Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami
    770 NE 125th Street
    March 11–May 6

    Curated by Bonnie Clearwater

    Ceal Floyer has a mathematician’s brain, a phenomenologist’s eye, and—belying the apparent reticence of her Minimalist-Conceptualist amalgams—a conjurer’s showmanship. Moving fleetly between formats (sculpture, video, drawing, photography, sound), the Pakistani-born, London-raised, Berlin-based artist specializes in elegant, witty, circular proposals that could almost be one-liners if they didn’t open onto questionings of perceptual habit and expectation. A bucket, seemingly catching a leak, conceals a speaker playing dripping sounds (Bucket, 1999); a performance is themed around stage fright (Nail Biting Performance, 2001); a bonsai is projected on the scale of a full-size tree (Overgrowth, 2006). This survey, collating some twenty works from 1992 through the present, accordingly promises plenty of practiced bait-and-switch, with cerebral pleasure giving way to rippling disquiet.

  • Cory Arcangel, CA 09 photoshop CS 110 by 72 inches, 300 DPI, RGB, square pixels, default gradient “Yellow, Violet, Red, Teal” mousedown y=16450 x=10750, mouse up y=18850 x=206002009, 2009, color photograph, 110 x 72".

    “Cory Arcangel: The Sharper Image”

    Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami
    770 NE 125th Street
    March 11–May 6

    Curated by Ruba Katrib

    Keep your Ray-Bans on: This solo museum show presents nearly thirty of Cory Arcangel’s multimedia works, which always appear to radiate a liquid-crystal halation. Glowing cyan Nintendo projections, C-prints of Photoshop’s slick color gradient, and unsightly 1990s HTML palettes are sure to add to the shine. But the artist’s slow burn follows a precise logic. He purposefully feeds various display technologies through different levels of time and skill, producing retro “structural films” made via consumer-friendly video software or splicing YouTube clips of cats walking on pianos so that they “play” a serial Schönberg tune. Coinciding with the final weeks of an exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art in Ann Arbor, this survey will include several new and rarely exhibited works. Arcangel’s puckish mix of futurity and obsolescence seems only to be getting brighter.