Montréal

Lyonel Feininger, Gelmeroda XIII, 1936, oil on canvas, 39 1/2 x 31 5/8" © Lyonel Feininger Family, LLC/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Lyonel Feininger, Gelmeroda XIII, 1936, oil on canvas, 39 1/2 x 31 5/8" © Lyonel Feininger Family, LLC/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Montréal

“Lyonel Feininger: At the Edge of the World”

Montreal Museum of Fine Arts
1380, rue Sherbrooke Ouest
January 20–May 13, 2012

Whitney Museum of American Art
99 Gansevoort Street
June 30–October 16, 2011

Curated by Barbara Haskell

Born in New York in 1871, Lyonel Feininger set off in 1887 to study art in Germany, where he enjoyed a successful practice as a graphic artist and caricaturist. He was active in the Berlin Secession and went on to teach at the Bauhaus; it was Feininger’s woodcut Cathedral, 1919, that served as the cover illustration for Walter Gropius’s epochal Bauhaus manifesto. But Feininger’s work was subsequently denounced as degenerate by the National Socialists, and he returned to the United States in 1937. Encompassing the full range of his production, from graphic art to abstract and figurative painting to photography, the Whitney’s retrospective will be the first in the US since 1966. An exhibition catalogue will feature essays by curator Barbara Haskell, curatorial assistant Sasha Nicholas, Ulrich Luckhardt, Bryan Gilliam, and John Carlin.