Washington, DC

Jeff Wall, The Destroyed Room, 1978, transparency in light box, 62 5/8 x 92 1/8". From “Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950.”

Jeff Wall, The Destroyed Room, 1978, transparency in light box, 62 5/8 x 92 1/8". From “Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950.”

Washington, DC

“Damage Control: Art and Destruction Since 1950”

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Independence Avenue at Seventh Street, SW
October 24, 2013–February 9, 2014

Curated by Kerry Brougher and Russell Ferguson

Not just a whimper but a bang: Postwar art overturned T. S. Eliot’s prediction of the way the world would end, producing visions of both spectacle and negation, euphoric flash and nihilistic critique. “Damage Control” promises to chart this obsession with destruction, addressing culture’s confrontation with the devastation of World War II and the rise of unprecedented technological, economic, and environmental risks. From Warhol’s car-crash Disasters to Jean Tinguely’s self-destroying sculptures, Christian Marclay’s punk-noir Guitar Drag, 2000, to Jeff Wall’s Destroyed Room, 1978, the exhibition will encompass ninety works by more than forty artists. Documentation of the 1966 Destruction in Art Symposium in London, which famously posed breakdown as aesthetic subject and structure, will be featured in the show as well as in a multi-authored catalogue.

Travels to the Kunsthaus Graz, Austria, and Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg in 2014.