New York

Benedetta, Sintesi delle comunicazioni aeree (Synthesis of Aerial Communications), 1933–34, tempera and encaustic on canvas, 10' 7 1/2“ x 6' 6 3/8”. From “Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe.”

Benedetta, Sintesi delle comunicazioni aeree (Synthesis of Aerial Communications), 1933–34, tempera and encaustic on canvas, 10' 7 1/2“ x 6' 6 3/8”. From “Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe.”

New York

“Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe”

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum | New York
1071 Fifth Avenue
February 21–September 1, 2014

Curated by Vivien Greene

The Italian Futurist movement was launched in 1909 with its belligerent leader F. T. Marinetti’s proclamation “Art can be nothing but violence, cruelty, and injustice.” Given the fashionability of social inclusion in art today, Marinetti’s dictate is a bracing reminder of a darker, more radical tradition of artistic activism. The Guggenheim’s survey of the movement will not only be sweeping—with more than three hundred works that cross the boundaries of art, architecture, design, film, literature, sound, and performance—but will be the first of its kind in the US. The exhibition and scholarly catalogue will document how the Futurists aimed at “reconstructing the universe” through intermediality as well as mechanized warfare, tracing the “heroic” years leading up to World War I and the fascist period of the 1920s–40s, when artists pressed on with their formal innovations in defiance of the times’ rappel à l’ordre.